These businesses can open in L.A. County beginning Friday

Jene J. Long
Manager Danny Justman at Pawnmart in Norwalk. <span class="copyright">(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Manager Danny Justman at Pawnmart in Norwalk. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

It’s not much, but Los Angeles County announced the very first steps in easing stay-at-home rules that have slowed the spread of coronavirus.

While some counties have defied the state and reopened widely, Los Angeles County said its easing efforts are much more modest, given the region remains the epicenter of coronavirus in California with more than 1,300 deaths.

Florists, car dealers and various types of brick-and-mortar stores — including those that sell toys, music, books, clothing and sporting goods — will be allowed to be open for curbside pickup only. In-store shopping will not be permitted.

Here are details:

Nonessential business: reopening for curbside pick-up with adherence to distancing and infection-control protocols

Outdoor parks and recreational facilities are open provided all activities adhere to distancing and infection-control protocols

These rules remain:

  • Wear a face covering

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We All Deserve Shorter, More Flexible Workweeks, Especially Amid COVID-19

Jene J. Long
Remote work and flexible work hours are some of the federal recommendations for stemming the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: AndreaObzerova via Getty Images)
Remote work and flexible work hours are some of the federal recommendations for stemming the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: AndreaObzerova via Getty Images)

As business begin to reopen during the coronavirus pandemic, employers are reimagining what the office of the future should look like. 

Some of those ideas are centered around increasing physical space between employees, as people working near each other can lead more easily to the spread of the contagious coronavirus. Of the 97 workers who tested positive for COVID-19 at one South Korean call center, 94 sat on the same floor and most of them were on the same side of the building.

The blue coloring indicates where people with confirmed coronaviruses cases sat in this call center in South Korea. (Photo: Emerging Infectious Disease Journal)
The blue coloring indicates where people with confirmed coronaviruses cases sat in this call center in South Korea. (Photo: Emerging Infectious Disease Journal)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is advising employers to keep staff, visitors, and customers six feet apart, and cubicles are

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Egypt reopens slowly to revive pandemic-hit economy

Jene J. Long

Cairo (AFP) – Egypt’s economy had just started to recover after years of political turmoil and militant attacks when the coronavirus crisis hit, impacting especially its vital tourism sector.

Now President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s government has loosened a strict curfew for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in an effort to kickstart North Africa’s largest economy.

Having shuttered shops and cafes in late March and forced millions of civil servants to stay home, it is slowly reversing some of these measures, bringing back many state workers and extending the trading hours of shops and malls.

The blessing for the emerging economy of more than 100 million people, experts say, is that activity has kept ticking over in agriculture and construction, and especially in the vast informal sector.

“Twenty-five percent of the workforce is in agriculture, which remains unaffected,” said Angus Blair, a business professor at the American University in Cairo.

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The climate gospel according to novelist Lydia Millet

Jene J. Long
Lydia Miller, author of "A Children's Bible." <span class="copyright">(Nola Millet)</span>
Lydia Miller, author of “A Children’s Bible.” (Nola Millet)

In the early 1990s, a young woman jumped from job to job on the scruffy edges of Hollywood before falling into copy-editing for knife and gun magazines. She moved through the ranks of the company — Larry Flynt Publications — until she was the copy chief at its flagship title, Hustler.

“Some of it I still think is kind of funny: ‘The Busty Beauties,’ that’s just what it sounds like,” Lydia Millet recalled with a low laugh. “The editor of that was completely obsessed with the large-breasted woman. He slept in his office, surrounded by his own magazine covers plastered on the walls.”

Some lives are neat, smooth arcs; Millet’s has zigged and zagged. While copy-editing porn she wrote a novel, then before it came out she went to grad school for environmental management at Duke. She moved to New York

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